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Using a 4K TV as digital picture frame?

Discussion in 'General Photography Discussion' started by ojporqpojrewpo, Dec 5, 2018.

  1. ojporqpojrewpo

    ojporqpojrewpo Premium Member

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    Recently I saw some people mentioning digital picture frames and I think I would like one. Problem is that the dedicated picture frames are quite expensive compared to TVs with the same specs. Does anybody know if the dedicated frames have a different technology that makes them more suitable for pictures or are TVs the same? I am thinking about getting a 4K TV and attaching an old laptop or a Raspberry Pi to it.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2018
  2. Ben Kennedy

    Ben Kennedy Premium Member

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    I think it's a decent idea. What I don't find appealing is how TV's display my photos - they really increase the contrast too far and oversharpen
    You'd have to color calibrate it specifically for photos and adjust the sharpness accordingly, but I think it could work
     
  3. ojporqpojrewpo

    ojporqpojrewpo Premium Member

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    Do you think TV's are fundamentally different or is it just a calibration problem?
     
  4. versesinanelegiacmetre

    versesinanelegiacmetre Premium Member

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    The same. It's just that a TV out of the box is set to garish levels.

    Most, If not all, 4k TVs will have some kind of direct USB input; no need for a laptop.
     
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  5. Jonimages

    Jonimages Premium Member

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    Most tv's give the user the ability to adjust contrast and sharpening. If you use the default profile most of the time you will get too much contrast and sharpening.

    A properly calibrated tv or just using a more subtle profile can produce stunning detail and colors.
     
  6. Alex Cremers

    Alex Cremers Premium Member

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    I have a monitor setting on my Philips OLED and it's quite neutral, without any of the picture enhancements, which you actually better don't use anyway.
     
  7. Frankie

    Frankie Premium Member

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    A 4k TV uses the same display as a 4k computer monitor...but with a tuner and other gismos you'd expect.

    [The Japanese government/NHK is hard at work providing 8k broadcast for the 2020 Olympics...so 8k TV/monitor would soon flood the market too.]

    For today, the input device is often just a built-in SD card reader, supported by a slide-show system all built-in... If you use a computer for supporting the display, you'd even be able to get files stored in the Cloud.

    You could pre-tweak your image files any way you want, or simply make it suitable for the inherent colour rendition best. [Most displays use standard colourimetry...in use since before most of us were born.]

    The image resolution is based on it's native pixel size...simple math. would tell you what it is.

    An [2k] HDTV is ~0.6mm in dot pitch, that means you won't see pixels 2m's [yards] away...'cause human visual acuity is only ~1 arc-minute, or 0.3mm/m in viewing distance unless you must bury your nose in every picture too...
     
  8. Jonimages

    Jonimages Premium Member

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    I just bought a LG OLED and the screensavers are actually digitally framed landscaped photographs. They look great. Many tv's come with SD or usb hubs so you wouldn't need to hookup a laptop.
     
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  9. Frankie

    Frankie Premium Member

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    Yeah, I still use a 10 year old Panasonic Plasma HDTV...the last of the breed. It has an SD card slot built-in, just plug my pictures in and play.

    A picture is technically an image in your mind. How you saw it or what you do with it is another subject all in itself.

    A 4k ~30" LCD monitor [~0.25mm dot pitch] is about $300...so hang one on your gallery wall with a velvet rope around it so that viewers won't get within 2 yards. :D
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2018
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  10. jamie allan

    jamie allan Premium Member

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    I think it would depend on how you use whatever display you buy. You can get a phenomena called image persistence on LED displays if a stationary image is displayed for too long. I worked in IT and my company had many instances where we had stationary images on LCD displays for long periods where image persistence eventually ruled out the display for any other use. So if you were to decide to display your favourite image for a week - say 10 hours a day - then this may be an issue sometime down the line.
     
  11. Frankie

    Frankie Premium Member

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    That is why most "slide-show" system changes pictures for you in cycles you'd set...preventing the burnt-in or persistency effect.

    My old plasma display was used for 4:3 TV format for a long while...Panasonic even had automatic pixel column shifts minimizing the burnt-in by the lateral black-out bands. It took almost 2 years for the burnt-in shadows to disappear after HDTV broadcast was in use.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2018
  12. Ben Kennedy

    Ben Kennedy Premium Member

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    Actually you are 100% correct - I was basing my thought on an older LED TV and how photo's look on that.... I'm sure the OLED and QLED 4K tvs make photos look stunning
     
  13. versesinanelegiacmetre

    versesinanelegiacmetre Premium Member

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    Older LED TV have the same type of control. While the newer TVs will look good, the older type also look good, when suitably adjusted.

    All will have contrast, black and white level, and WB adjustment of some sort.
     
  14. gyoung

    gyoung Premium Member

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    Most tvs I've seen will display jpegs in numerical order so you have to change file names. I've been making pdf slide shows in Lightroom, you can set the resolution, which I have done to 4K, ready for a future upgrade as we only have HD at the moment. You need a laptop then to display on the tv.

    Gerry
     
  15. Jonimages

    Jonimages Premium Member

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    Older tv's have brightness and contrast settings too. They are like any other monitor. You have to calibrate, make adjustments or select a more neutral picture profile.
     
  16. Frankie

    Frankie Premium Member

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    You could even buy software for calibrating a monitor to standard colour gamut...
     
  17. Filmick28

    Filmick28 Member

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    FYI... the problem with modern LED displays:

    Please login or register to view links
     
  18. versesinanelegiacmetre

    versesinanelegiacmetre Premium Member

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    Very true, and a useful reminder.

    Thankfully still images don't suffer from this motion blur/smoothing.

    I make a point of switching off these auto settings on every TV in every hotel room I stay in.
     
  19. Alex Cremers

    Alex Cremers Premium Member

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    I usually see the framed paintings slideshow on LG OLED TVs. I wish I had that app on my Philips.
     
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  20. Jonimages

    Jonimages Premium Member

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    I don't like the digital smoothing of movement but I also don't like the jutter during panning scenes. I have a custom setting that is a compromise. It avoids the soap opera effect but also smooths out panning movements.

    Nolan isn't a big fan either.
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