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Out of my comfort zone

Discussion in 'Sports' started by jamie allan, Aug 8, 2018.

  1. jamie allan

    jamie allan Premium Member

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    I normally take images of mostly static objects - architecture, landscapes and mainly stationary wildlife. Today I had an opportunity to try something different. The European Championships Time Trial Road Race passed through my neighbourhood so I thought I'd try shooting some sport. Well I think I'll need practice technique if I want to try that again. It wasn't helped that I chose a spot that was probably one of the fastest places on the course with a 12.5% descent - where the riders were travelling at 60kmph. Anyway here's some of my few usable images.
    X-T2 50-230 @162mm f9 1/1000 iso800
    tt 5.jpg
    X-T2 50-230 @50mm f9 1/1000 iso800
    tt 9.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2018
    leoda1945, Beaumont, J J and 4 others like this.
  2. jamie allan

    jamie allan Premium Member

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    Some more
    X-T2 50-230 @53mm f9 1/1000 iso800
    tt 10.jpg
    X-T2 50-230 @80mm f9 1/1000 iso800
    tt 11.jpg
    X-T2 50-230 @80mm f9 1/1000 iso800
    tt 12.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2018
  3. jamie allan

    jamie allan Premium Member

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    I like the look on the whippet's face - call that fast?
    X-T2 50-230 @162mm f9 1/500 iso800
    tt 4.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2018
  4. AnthonyM

    AnthonyM Premium Member

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    Well caught and captured. §1 and §2 are my favourites, with the following thoughts.

    In §1, you might consider lifting the brightness on the rider, as his facial expression is interesting.

    For the others, I feel that the backgrounds sometimes detract, particularly where the spectators are not interested in the rider who has been captured. If they are not interested, why should we be, is the possible implication.
     
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  5. yashica boy

    yashica boy Premium Member

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    Nice work Jamie like them all
     
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  6. J J

    J J Premium Member

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    What camera/lens/settings Jamie? If you’ll pardon the enquiry.. I couldn’t ascertain from EXIF.
    They’re all great by the way, you did a good job.
     
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  7. jamie allan

    jamie allan Premium Member

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    J.J.
    Sorry I forgot to input the detail. I've edited the posts with the correct exif detail now.
     
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  8. SixstringSlinger

    SixstringSlinger Active Member

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    Nice work! Sports is a tough one. Back in my film days I did a lot of motorsports photography. I found using slower shutter speeds say 1/200 to 1/250 and panning to blur the background gave a much greater sensation of speed in the photo. It also increases the blur of the wheel spin. The vehicle, whatever it is, looks like it is going fast.

    I like to use manual focus for this by pre-focusing on the spot I will be tripping the shutter. I have my shutter speed and f stop selected, pan the object to my release point and bang. I just captured a race care at 200+ kph that looks like it's going 200+ kph! It takes practice but I think it's worth it.
     
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  9. jamie allan

    jamie allan Premium Member

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    Anthony,
    Thanks for the reply. I take your point with the spectators but I couldn't get any part of the hill that didn't have spectators and I wanted to give some idea of the downhill gradient. The close in shots don't really convey how steep the hill is. When I was much younger I used to cycle to work on this route. I had a speedometer on my bike and even I could hit 55kmph on that hill. It was downhill on my way to work in the morning and uphill returning after a day at the office 15km away. Doing that uphill climb sure banished the issues encountered during the day's work.:)
     
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  10. jamie allan

    jamie allan Premium Member

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    One thing I did notice today with the X-T2 and it's new NP-W126S battery - I took over 300 images and the battery indicator is still showing 4 bars out of 5. I have boost mode on, was shooting CL, saving raw+jpeg fine and did a fair degree of checking images taken on the LCD ( I hate the term Chimping). I've read that the X-T2 battery indicator is more accurate and if it is the case that I've got between 60-80% battery power left I'm impressed.
     
  11. AnthonyM

    AnthonyM Premium Member

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    That matches my experience of CH shooting. I averaged around 1,000 shots per battery shooting a cricket match, even with a lot of image review. Shooting single shots with the same batteries gives me a lot less shots per battery, more like 300.
     
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  12. Gillioen

    Gillioen Member

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    I would use much lower shutter speed like 1/60
    if you do that and pan, the backgroud will be blurry and less distracting
     
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  13. leoda1945

    leoda1945 Premium Member

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    Good to get out of our little boxes and try new things.
    I like these.
    If you enjoy the fast action, stay with it !!
     
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  14. robert

    robert Administrator Staff Member

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    I started shooting bike races earlier this year, after doing a lot of motorsports in previous years. It's not easy, takes a lot of practice! I'm getting better, slowly.

    These conditions were very challenging, @jamie allan, but well done.
     
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  15. DaveKennedy

    DaveKennedy Well-Known Member

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    I'd concur with the other folks that replied about a slower shutter speed so you get a bit of a sense of movement from at least the wheels on the bikes. Also if you're shooting from a side angle like you were you can take advantage of that by panning with the bikes as they pass. If you're shooting with a wider lens like you were in this case, and can't isolate the subjects, panning can help separate (visually speaking) the bikes from the background.
     
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  16. DaveKennedy

    DaveKennedy Well-Known Member

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    The second shot in this post is an example of what I mentioned with the panning effect helping to isolate the subject from background.
    Please login or register to view links
     
  17. jamie allan

    jamie allan Premium Member

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    Thanks all for the comments. It's the first time I've tried moving subjects - other than the occasional bird in flight. I found it extremely difficult panning with many shots of a riders bum the only object in frame:mad:. I tried a slower shutter but as my panning was so bad I ended up with everything blurred. That's when I moved down to the bend at the bottom of the hill so I could get some close up, in focus shots. These events don't happen often here so I can't see me getting many opportunities to improve on panning. I think standing at the side of the road tracking cars might get me into a whole lot of bother. I can see it's a real art to getting it right with slow shutter and focussed object.
     
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  18. DaveKennedy

    DaveKennedy Well-Known Member

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    You could practice with moving cars. Depending on the light sometimes you'd have to adjust up or down to see what shutter speed works best. Panning is something that's hard to master but you can do it with practice.
     
  19. J J

    J J Premium Member

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    You've also showcased/promoted that 50-230 nicely. Is that Ben waiting patiently in the background?
     

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